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July 5, 2019 – Laparoscopic Gastric Surgery Also Deemed Effective in Advanced Gastric Cancer

Laparoscopic surgery was only known to have an advantage in early-stage gastric cancer and most advanced-stage cancers were treated by conventional open surgery. However, a study done in Korea has determined that laparoscopic surgery showed excellent results in terms of pain index, inflammatory response, and complication incidence. The lead researcher suggested that laparoscopic surgery could provide a clearer view and reduced bleeding during operations.

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July 4, 2019 – Study Uncovers Origin of Cell Layer that Hides Stomach Cancer

A group of researchers from Hiroshima recently discovered the origin of a normal-looking stomach lining that covers sites of gastric cancer and makes it difficult to spot after the eradication of an H. pylori infection. H. pylori infection is a major cause of stomach cancer and causes inflammation by releasing substances that can destroy cells that line the stomach. This destruction and regeneration of tissue can lead to stomach cancer. This study found that even after treatment of the infection, H. pylori leaves behind layers of cells that seem normal but actually originate from stomach cancer tissue. Thus, clinicians should be aware of these layers as to not miss potential stomach cancer sites when treating patients who have been treated for H. pylori infection.

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July 2, 2019 – Greater Awareness Needed of Stomach Cancer Risk in Under-40s, Especially in Latin America [ESMO World GI Press Release]

Stomach cancer should no longer be considered a disease only of older people, and patients under 40 with chronic digestive symptoms should be more actively investigated – especially if they are of Latin American ethnicity. This advice follows new data from a retrospective, observational study in Mexico which showed that one in seven of over 2,000 patients diagnosed with gastric cancer between 2004 and 2016 were under 40.

 

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February 25, 2019 – Defense Health Program Department of Defense Peer Reviewed Cancer Research Program Funding Opportunities for Fiscal Year 2019 (FY19)

The FY19 Defense Appropriation provides $90 million (M) to the U.S. Department of Defense Peer Reviewed Cancer Research Program (PRCRP) to support innovative, high-impact cancer research. As directed by the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs, the Defense Health Agency J9, Research and Development Directorate manages the Defense Health Program (DHP) Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E) appropriation. The managing agent for the anticipated Program Announcements/Funding Opportunities is the Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs (CDMRP) at the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (USAMRMC).
 

February 25, 2019 – FDA Approves Taiho Oncology’s LONSURF® (trifluridine/tipiracil) for Adult Patients with Previously Treated Advanced Gastric or Gastroesophageal Junction (GEJ) Adenocarcinoma

Taiho Oncology, Inc. today announced that the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved LONSURF® as a treatment for adult patients with metastatic gastric or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma previously treated with at least two prior lines of chemotherapy that included a fluoropyrimidine, a platinum, either a taxane or irinotecan, and if appropriate, HER2/neu-targeted therapy.

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January 18, 2019 – Trifluridine/tipiracil continues to show benefit in metastatic gastric cancer

A double-blind phase 3 trial in Japan found that a combination of trifluridine and tipiracil significantly prolonged survival in patients with metastatic stomach cancer. These drugs improved overall survival compared to placebo regardless of gastrectomy. Results showed a 31 percent risk reduction of death which translates into an average increased survival time of 2.1 months compared to placebo.

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January 7, 2019 – Clinical trial to develop breath test for multiple cancers

UK researchers have recently launched a new clinical trial to develop a breath test that could help detect multiple cancer types. This technology could help doctors detect and diagnose cancers earlier by measuring volatile organic compounds (VOCs) through breath biopsy. Depending on conditions, cells can release different patterns of VOCs, and this trial sets out to evaluate if this tool can differentiate between patients with and without various cancer types.This trial will start off with patients with esophageal and stomach cancer and then expand to more cancer types, and is estimated to complete in December 2021.

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October 26, 2018 – FDA Accepts Supplemental New Drug Application for the Treatment of Metastatic Gastric/Gastroesophageal Junction (GEJ) Adenocarcinoma

Taiho Oncology announced that the FDA has granted priority review for the supplemental New Drug Application (sNDA) for LONSURF as new treatment for patients with previously treated advanced or metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma. The drug trial met its primary goal of prolonged overall survival and secondary endpoint measurements of progression-free survival (PFS) in addition to consistent safety and tolerability. LONSURF is a combination of trifluridine, a nucleoside metabolic inhibitor, and tipiracil, a thymidide phosphorylase inhibitor.

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September 12, 2018 – H. pylori test hints at risk factor for stomach cancer

Helicobacter pylori, a specific strain of bacteria found more often in East Asian patients may be a risk factor for stomach cancer. Doctors want to identify who is most at risk for cancer carrying out a pilot study that would shape treatment and screening strategies for patients infected with this bacterium. Dr. Nina Salama considers that the global differences in stomach cancer risk can be partly attributed to differences in H. pylori itself. One way that H. pylori varies is in the CogA gene which encodes a toxin that helps the bacterium better attach to cells lining the stomach.

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August 30, 2018- Mutations in MUC16 Gene May Help Define Immunotherapy Strategies for Gastric Cancer, Study Suggests

Understanding the mutation in the MUC16 gene may be vital to help predict the outcome of the disease as well as possible treatments available for gastric cancer patients. The MUC16 mutation is thought to increase cancer cell’s susceptibility to immunotherapies. Although the genetics of gastric cancer varies greatly from person to person, mutations in the MUC16 gene are very common in gastric cancer as well as other types of cancer. Researchers at Wake Forest University analyzed this mutation and found that MUC16 mutations affects 38.4% of stomach cancer. Moreover, samples containing MUC16 were 1.87 times more likely to have additional mutations. However, patients with the MUC16 mutation lived longer than those with the unaltered gene with a 39% increase in survival. The researchers believe that the use of therapeutic regimens to abrogate immune inhibition may be beneficial for patients with gastric cancer who have MUC16 mutations.

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